Appraisal Variable/Affect Relationships in Youth Sport: A Test of Weiner's Attributional Model

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $84.00

1 year subscription

USD  $111.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $159.00

2 year subscription

USD  $208.00

The purposes of this study were to (a) determine the nature and extent of appraisal variable/affect relationships in a youth sport achievement setting, (b) assess gender differences in these relationships, and (c) evaluate the applicability of Werner's (1985) attributional theory of achievement motivation and emotion to the domain of youth sport. After participating in a 6-week competitive team sport program, subjects (N=746) were measured on (a) perceived performance, (b) causal attributions and dimensionality, and (c) general, self-related, and other-related affective reactions to performance outcome. Canonical correlation and regression analyses revealed significant appraisal variable/affect relationships, which were similar across the gender groups. Weiner's model received partial support but there were inconsistencies in terms of the model's overall fit. The need for a more elaborate sport-specific model of the antecedents of affect (vis-à-vis Vallerand, 1987) is stressed, and recommendations for future research are briefly outlined.

Dave W. Robinson is with the School of Outdoor Recreation, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1. Bruce L. Howe is with the School of Physical Education at the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 79 79 8
Full Text Views 5 5 2
PDF Downloads 7 7 2