Goal Settings Self-Efficacy, and Exercise Behavior

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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Whereas the success of goal setting is well documented in the industrial-organizational literature (Locke & Latham, 1990), the empirical efforts to determine its effectiveness in sport settings have met with minimal success, and no studies exist that document the role played by goals in successful adherence to exercise regimens. We examined the relationships among goals, efficacy, and exercise behavior in the context of community conditioning classes. Female participants' goal efficacy was predictive of perceived goal achievement at the end of the program, and exercise self-efficacy was significantly related to subsequent intensity but not frequency of exercise participation. Moreover, a proposed interaction between exercise importance and self-efficacy failed to account for further variation in physical activity participation. The results are discussed in terms of the physical activity history of the sample and the roles played by goals and efficacy at diverse stages of the exercise process.

Kim Poag is with the Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1. Edward McAuley is with the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Illinois, 215 Freer Hall, 906 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801.

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