Conscientiousness, Extroversion, and Action Control: Comparing Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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  • 1 University of Amsterdam
  • 2 University of Victoria
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The present study explored the influence of the Big Five dimensions extroversion and conscientiousness on action control regarding both moderate and vigorous physical activity within the framework of the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Prospective data were available from 186 respondents, who completed measures of intention, cognitive and affective attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, extroversion, conscientiousness, and physical activity at T1. Four weeks later, physical activity was assessed again. Respondents were grouped into four profiles: nonintenders, successful nonintenders, unsuccessful intenders, and successful intenders. Logistic regression analyses revealed that successful enactment in moderate physical activity was associated with extroversion, subjective norm, and affective attitude, whereas successful enactment in vigorous physical activity was associated with conscientiousness. Findings illustrate the differential role played by personality dimensions and TPB concepts in the explanation of moderate and vigorous physical activity action control.

De Bruijn, de Groot, and van den Putte are with the Amsterdam School of Communications Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Rhodes is with the Behavioural Medicine Laboratory Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada.