Developmental Activities That Contribute to High or Low Performance by Elite Cricket Batters When Recognizing Type of Delivery From Bowlers’ Advanced Postural Cues

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology

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Paul R. FordLiverpool John Moores University

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Jeffrey LowLiverpool John Moores University

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Allistair P. McRobertLiverpool John Moores University

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A. Mark WilliamsLiverpool John Moores University

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We examined the developmental activities that contribute to the development of superior anticipation skill among elite cricket batters. The batters viewed 36 video clips involving deliveries from bowlers that were occluded at ball release and were required to predict delivery type. Accuracy scores were used to create two subgroups: high-performing and low-performing anticipators. Questionnaires were used to record the participation history profiles of the groups. In the early stages of development, hours accumulated in cricket and other sports, as well as milestones achieved, did not differentiate groups. Significant between-group differences in activity profiles were found between 13 and 15 years of age, with high-performing anticipators accumulating more hours in structured cricket activity, and specifically in batting, compared with their low-performing counterparts.

The authors are with the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, U.K.

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