The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Executive Function Performance in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) consistently perform worse on executive function (EF) tasks relative to those without AD/HD. Physical activity has a small effect on cognition in children and may be particularly beneficial for children with AD/HD by impacting fundamental EF deficiencies that characterize this disorder. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which physical activity is associated with EF in children with AD/HD. Eighteen boys (M age = 10.61, SD = 1.50) with AD/HD were recruited to complete four EF tasks. Physical activity was measured with an accelerometer that provided daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity; this measure was a significant predictor of performance on the Tower of London planning task, adjusted R2 = .28, F(1, 16) = 7.61, p < .05, and was positively associated with other EF measures. These results suggest that higher physical activity is associated with better EF performance in AD/HD children.

Jennifer Gapin is now with the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, Southern Illinois University–Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL. Jennifer L. Etnier is with the Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina–Greensboro, Greensboro, NC.

Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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