On the Same Page in Sporting Dyads: Does Dissimilarity on 2 × 2 Achievement Goal Constructs Impair Relationship Functioning?

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
View More View Less
  • 1 University of Western Australia
  • 2 Loughborough University
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $85.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $114.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $162.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $216.00

This study examined the extent to which 2 × 2 achievement goal constructs (Elliot, 1999) were associated with key relational perceptions (i.e., relationship commitment, relationship satisfaction) for members of athlete-athlete dyads. Both members from 82 regional-level partnerships (mean age = 22.72, SD = 3.83) were recruited from a variety of dyadic sports (e.g., tennis, badminton, rowing). Actor-partner interdependence model analyses revealed that greater dissimilarity between partners on mastery-approach and performance-approach goals was associated with lower commitment and satisfaction. Mastery goals displayed positive actor effects with respect to both relationship perceptions, whereas performance-avoidance goals were negatively related to commitment (i.e., actor and partner effects) and satisfaction (i.e., partner effect). These results indicate that achievement goal constructs may align with important interpersonal perceptions in athlete dyads.

Ben Jackson is with the School of Sport Science, Exercise, and Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. Chris G. Harwood is with the School of Sport, Exercise, and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, United Kingdom. J. Robert Grove is with the School of Sport Science, Exercise, and Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia.