Examining the Influence of Other-Efficacy and Self-Efficacy on Personal Performance

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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This research examined the relative effects of other-efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs in relation to individual performance within a cooperative dyadic setting. Pairs of female participants (Mage = 20.08, SD = 1.93) performed three practice trials on a dyadic dance-based videogame. Other-efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs were then manipulated through the provision of bogus feedback regarding each pair member's coordination abilities. Following the administration of this feedback, pairs performed a final trial on this dance-based task. The results revealed a main effect for other-efficacy, such that participants in the enhanced other-efficacy conditions outperformed those in the inhibited other-efficacy conditions on this task. A main effect for self-efficacy was not observed. Furthermore, there was no evidence of an interaction between other-efficacy and self-efficacy. The results of this study suggest that other-efficacy may supersede the effects of self-efficacy in supporting personal performance within cooperative relational contexts.

William Dunlop and Daniel J. Beatty are with the Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Mark R. Beauchamp is with the School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.