Passion and Coping: Relationships With Changes in Burnout and Goal Attainment in Collegiate Volleyball Players

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
View More View Less
  • 1 University of British Columbia
  • | 2 University of Ottawa
Restricted access

This study examined the relationship between harmonious and obsessive passion and coping, and assessed whether coping mediated the relationship between passion types and changes in burnout and goal attainment. College- and university-level volleyball players (N = 421) completed measures of passion, coping, burnout, and goal attainment at the start and end of a season. Results of structural equation modeling, using a true latent change approach, supported a model whereby types of passion were indirectly related to changes in burnout and goal attainment via coping. Harmonious passion was positively related to task-oriented coping which, in turn, was positively associated with change in goal attainment. Obsessive passion was positively associated with disengagement-oriented coping which, in turn, was positively and negatively associated with changes in burnout and goal attainment, respectively. This study identifies coping as a reason why passionate athletes may experience changes in burnout and goal attainment over the course of a season.

Benjamin J.I. Schellenberg is now with the Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. Patrick Gaudreau is with the School of Psychology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Peter R.E. Crocker is with the School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.