The Relationship of Explicit–Implicit Evaluative Discrepancy to Exercise Dropout in Middle-Aged Adults

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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  • 1 University of Alberta
  • 2 Western University
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Discrepancies between automatically activated associations (i.e., implicit evaluations) and explicit evaluations of motives (measured with a questionnaire) could lead to greater information processing to resolve discrepancies or self-regulatory failures that may affect behavior. This research examined the relationship of health and appearance exercise-related explicit–implicit evaluative discrepancies, the interaction between implicit and explicit evaluations, and the combined value of explicit and implicit evaluations (i.e., the summed scores) to dropout from a yearlong exercise program. Participants (N = 253) completed implicit health and appearance measures and explicit health and appearance motives at baseline, prior to starting the exercise program. The sum of implicit and explicit appearance measures was positively related to weeks in the program, and discrepancy between the implicit and explicit health measures was negatively related to length of time in the program. Implicit exercise evaluations and their relationships to oft-cited motives such as appearance and health may inform exercise dropout.

Berry and Rodgers are with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. Divine and Hall are with the School of Kinesiology, Western University, London, ON, Canada.

Berry (Tanya.berry@ualberta.ca) is corresponding author.
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