Interplay Between Workload and Functional Perceptual–Cognitive–Affective Responses: An Inclusive Model

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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The extent to and manner in which psychological states change as a function of physical effort and related physiological responses have been addressed separately in various theoretical frameworks. The authors explored a proposed conceptual scheme examining the relationships among perceived exertion, attentional allocation, and affective responses under different workload domains. Thirty male participants performed an incremental cycling test to assess the progression of rating of perceived exertion, attentional focus, affect, and felt arousal along a parallel increase in heart rate using ventilatory threshold as a reference point. Results revealed that ventilatory threshold acts as a metabolic landmark for the attentional shifts toward aversive sensory cues, sustained increases in perceived exertion, negative valence, and physiological activation. Monitoring the dynamics of perceived exertion, attention, and affect can complement physiological measures for an accurate control of training workloads during exercise prescription.

Alvarez-Alvarado, Chow, Gabana, and Tenenbaum are with the Dept. of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, College of Education, and Hickner, the Dept. of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Science, College of Human Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL.

Alvarez-Alvarado (sa12d@my.fsu.edu) is corresponding author.
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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