Reciprocal Relationships Between Efficacy and Performance in Athlete Dyads: Self-, Other-, and Collective Constructs

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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This study’s purpose was to evaluate the unique contributions of self-, other-, and collective constructs in the efficacy–performance reciprocal relationship for athlete dyads involving low- and high-dependence roles. Data were obtained from 74 intact cheerleading pairs on self-, other-, and collective efficacy and subjective performance evaluations for each of 5 successive trials. Objective assessments of dyad performances were obtained from digital recordings. Across path models involving a single efficacy construct, similar reciprocal relationships between objective dyad performance and self-, other-, or collective efficacy were observed. In path models composed of multiple efficacy or performance constructs, unique efficacy contributions were observed in the prediction of objective dyad performance, and unique subjective performance contributions were observed in the prediction of efficacy beliefs. Partner effects were observed more often for athletes in the high-dependence role than for those in the low-dependence role. Findings support how self-, other-, and collective beliefs are processed by team athletes.

Habeeb is with the College of Health and Human Performance, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. Eklund is with the College of Education, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. Coffee is with the Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport, University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom.

Habeeb (habeebc18@ecu.edu) is corresponding author.
Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology

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