The Effect of Choice on Motor Learning for Learners With Different Levels of Intrinsic Motivation

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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This study examines whether the positive effect of choice on motor learning in a dart-throwing task varies by intrinsic motivation. Participants were allocated to a highly motivated or less-motivated group based on measured task motivation and randomly to a Choice or No Choice group. In Experiment 1, participants in the Choice group chose their dart color. In Experiment 2, they chose when to observe a model demonstration. Results showed that the effect of choice on motor learning differed between highly and less-motivated participants in Experiment 1 (i.e., interaction between motivation and choice) but not Experiment 2 (i.e., main effects of motivation and choice). Specifically, motor learning was enhanced in less-motivated but not highly motivated participants when choosing dart color, while it was enhanced regardless of initial intrinsic motivation when choosing model-demonstration time. Therefore, external provision of choice in a motor-learning situation may not be equally effective across learners.

Ikudome, Mori, and Nakamoto are with the Faculty of Physical Education, and Kou, the Graduate School of Physical Education, National Inst. of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, Kanoya, Japan. Ogasa is with the Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.

Ikudome (ra_sa1101@yahoo.co.jp) is corresponding author.
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