Cognitive–Perceptual–Affective–Motivational Dynamics During Incremental Workload Accounting for Exertion Tolerance

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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Inquiry of the psychological states during the exercise experience failed to fully account for the role of motivation to adhere and the disposition of exertion tolerance (ET). The current study expands the scope of the integrated cognitive–perceptual–affective framework by measuring the motivation to sustain effort in two physical tasks and accounting for ET. Thirty male participants performed cycling and isometric handgrip tasks to assess the progression of the rating of perceived exertion, attentional focus, affective responses, and motivation to adhere, along with an incremental workload. The ET was determined by a handgrip task time to voluntary exhaustion. The findings indicated significant time effects and linear trends for perceived exertion, attentional focus, affect, and perceived arousal but not motivation to adhere during the handgrip and cycling tasks. The ET played a key role in the integrity of the model, particularly in perceptual, attentional, and affective responses. The intended model serves to stimulate new research into adaptation mechanisms.

Alvarez-Alvarado is with the Dept. of Clinical and Health Psychology, College of Public Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. Tenenbaum is with the Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel.

Alvarez-Alvarado (salvarezalvarado@phhp.ufl.edu) is corresponding author.
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