Sensation Seeking and Participation in Sporting Activities

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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A life-span inventory of sports participation and Zuckerman's (1979) Sensation Seeking Scale, Form V, were administered to 97 male and 104 female undergraduate students. The results indicated that, over time, high sensation seekers tend to become involved in more sports than do low sensation seekers, but low sensation seekers tend to remain involved with each sport for longer periods of time than do high sensation seekers. Gender and sensation seeking were found to interact in the choice of sporting activities. Low but generally positive correlations were observed between sensation seeking and participation in risky sports. These data suggest that both the need for new experiences and an attraction to high risk characterize the high sensation seeker 's participation in sporting activities.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Guy L. Rowland, Dept. of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4.

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