Generality and Specificity of Attention Belated to Competitive Anxiety and Sport Performance

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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  • 1 Michigan State University
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The Test of Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS) was developed as an objective measure by which an individual's attentional predisposition could be identified and used to predict performance on a variety of tasks. The present study had three purposes: (a) to construct a baseball/softball batting (B-TAIS) version of each TAIS attentional subscale, (b) to compare TAIS and B-TAIS reliability, and (c) to compare TAIS and B-TAIS validity. Both instruments were administered to 29 intercollegiate baseball and softball players. The B-TAIS demonstrated slightly higher test-restest reliability on five of the six attentional subscales and was higher than the TAIS in internal consistency on all subscales. Batting performance was positively related to all B-TAIS subscales assessing effective attentional deployment and negatively related to all subscales assessing ineffective attention. Significant positive correlations also existed between B-TAIS ineffective subscale scores and competitive trait anxiety. However, these relationships were not found with the general TAIS.

This investigation was conducted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. degree under the direction of Dr. Deborah L. Feltz at Michigan State University.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Richard R. Albrecht, 2051.M. Sports-Circle, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824.

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