Perceived Role Characteristics and Executive Satisfaction in Voluntary Sport Associations

in Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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This study tested the relationship between perceived role characteristics and role satisfaction among sport executives. It also investigated the relative importance of role characteristics and individual variables in the prediction of role satisfaction. Measures of perceived role characteristics and role satisfaction were obtained through content analysis of interviews with 60 executives involved in Quebec amateur sport federations. Demographic data were gathered by questionnaire. Results indicated positive correlations between perceived role characteristics and role satisfaction. As demonstrated by multiple regression analysis, the selected individual characteristics (age and marital status) were not predictive of role satisfaction. Use of competence, autonomy, role significance, and recognition were found to be the four major determinants of role satisfaction within the voluntary sport associations.

This study was funded by Grant No. 1839 from Fitness Canada.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Genevieve Rail, School of Human Movement, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ont., Canada P3E 2C6.

Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
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