The Nature of Managerial Work in Canadian Intercollegiate Athletics

in Journal of Sport Management
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This study described and analyzed the managerial work in Canadian intercollegiate athletics. The directors of 37 Canadian intercollegiate athletic departments responded to a questionnaire eliciting perceived importance of, time devoted to, and percentage responsibility for 19 managerial activities carried out by athletic departments. These managerial activities were largely patterned after Mintzberg's (1975) description of managerial work and were verified by a group of experts. Results showed that financial management, leadership, policy making, disturbance handling, revenue generation, and a Mete affairs were perceived to be the most important and most time consuming activities. Information seeking, maintenance activities, and league responsibilities were rated the least important. The athletic directors reported that they were largely responsible for the more important tasks with average percent responsibility of 55%. The average responsibility assigned to assistant directors was 29.5%, and this limited responsibility was significantly but inversely related to the importance of the tasks.

K.E. Danylchuk is with the School of Kinesiology at The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7. P. Chelladurai is with the School of Physical Activity and Education Services at The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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