Student-Athletes’ Organization of Activism at the University of Missouri: Resource Mobilization on Twitter

in Journal of Sport Management
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Although social media has been increasingly noted as an outlet for athletes to openly address social issues, there has been very little systematic examination on the organizational capacity of social media. To address this, our study seeks to focus on the strike organized by the football players through Twitter at the University of Missouri in 2015. Specifically, it adopts the theoretical framework of resource mobilization and conducts a comprehensive analysis composed of two parts. First, by identifying geographic characteristics and participant groups for #ConcernedStudent1950, it seeks to reveal the mobilization scope and impact. Second, a social network analysis is used to delineate the organizational dynamics of the players’ protest networks. The results yield both theoretical and practical implications for athletes’ engagement in social activism in the digital era.

Yan and Watanabe are with the Department of Sport and Entertainment Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Pegoraro is with the School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Grace Yan at CHENGYAN@mailbox.sc.edu.
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