The Role of the Commonwealth Youth Games in Pre-elite Athlete Development

in Journal of Sport Management
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Through the lens of the theory of reasoned action and the framework of attraction, retention, transition, and nurturing of athletes, this study examined how athletes’ experiences at the Commonwealth Youth Games contributed to satisfaction with the event, while encouraging transition into higher levels of competition. A total of 244 athletes from 23 different countries who completed a survey helped identify the environment-related aspects that created positive and negative experiences. The participants noted that learning from various social and cultural experiences influenced their event satisfaction and their future intention to remain in high-performance sport. Aspects of the event service environment, including poor accommodation and nutrition, were found to negatively impact performance. This paper contributes to the role of pre-elite events as athletic development agents that aid in talent transition. The results have implications for event organizers and high-performance managers regarding the influence of athletes’ experiences on performances and intention to transition.

MacIntosh is with the School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Sotiriadou is with the Department of Tourism, Sport and Hotel Management, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

MacIntosh (eric.macintosh@uottawa.ca) is corresponding author.
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