Cryotherapy Does Not Affect Peroneal Reaction Following Sudden Inversion

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context:

If ankle joint cryotherapy impairs the ability of the ankle musculature to counteract potentially injurious forces, the ankle is left vulnerable to injury.

Objective:

To compare peroneal reaction to sudden inversion following ankle joint cryotherapy.

Design:

Repeated measures design with independent variables, treatment (cryotherapy and control), and time (baseline, immediately post treatment, 15 minutes post treatment, and 30 minutes post treatment).

Setting:

University research laboratory.

Patients or Other Participants:

Twenty-seven healthy volunteers.

Intervention(s):

An ice bag was secured to the lateral ankle joint for 20 minutes.

Main Outcome Measures:

The onset and average root mean square amplitude of EMG activity in the peroneal muscles was calculated following the release of a trap door mechanism causing inversion.

Results:

There was no statistically significant change from baseline for peroneal reaction time or average peroneal muscle activity at any post treatment time.

Conclusions:

Cryotherapy does not affect peroneal muscle reaction following sudden inversion perturbation.

Christine Berg is with Newport News, VA Public Schools. E-mail: bergc103@hotmail.com. Joseph M. Hart is with the University of Virginia Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Charlottesville. E-mail: jmh3zf@virginia.edu. Kevin M. Cross is with the University of Virginia Department of Athletics. E-mail: kmc73@virginia.edu. Riann Palmieri-Smith is with the Division of Kinesiology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. E-mail: riannp@umich.edu. Christopher D. Ingersoll is with the University of Virginia Department of Human Services. E-mail: Ingersoll@virginia.edu.