A Reversal Theory Analysis of Psychological Responses during Sports Injury Rehabilitation

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context:

Few studies have examined psychological and emotional processes in injury rehabilitation from a longitudinal, theoretically framed perspective.

Objective:

This study explored the applicability of Reversal Theory to examine these processes.

Setting:

University of Wales, Aberystwyth, UK.

Participants:

Three severely injured athletes; two were female (karate and judo) and one was male (hockey), aged 20 to 28.

Main Outcome Measures:

Fortnightly interviews after participant’s initial consultation with a sports therapist, until complete physical rehabilitation.

Results:

Supported the use of Reversal Theory in this context (eg, as a means of understanding the origins of athletes’ emotional responses to injury and changes in these responses throughout rehabilitation).

Conclusions:

Suggestions for future research are made (eg, examining the consequences of emotional and metamotivational states for athlete behavior and recovery outcomes during rehabilitation).

Joanne Thatcher is with Aberystwyth University, Wales, Department of Sport & Exercise Health Science. Melissa Day is with the University of Chichester, School of Sport and Exercise Science. John Kerr is with Kokushikan University in Japan, and Kristy Amies is the Abersytwyth Sports Therapy Clinic. E-mail: jet@aber.ac.uk.