Hydration Status, Sweat Rates, and Rehydration Education of Youth Football Campers

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

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Brendon P. McDermott
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Douglas J. Casa
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Susan W. Yeargin
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Matthew S. Ganio
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Rebecca M. Lopez
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Elizabeth A. Mooradian
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Context:

Previous field research has not identified sweat rates (SR), fluid consumption (FC), or the efficacy of an educational intervention (EI) for youth during football camp.

Objective:

To measure hydration status and rehydration performance and examine EI using these data.

Design:

Observational with EI randomized comparison.

Participants:

Thirty-three boys (mean ± SD: 12 ± 2 y, 52.9 ± 13.6 kg, 156 ± 12 cm) volunteered during a 5-d camp with 3 (~2-h) sessions per day (WBGT: 25.6 ± 0.5°C).

Main Outcome Measures:

Hydration status, SR, and FC.

Results:

Urine osmolality averaged 796 ± 293 mOsm/L for days 2-5. Game SR (1.30 ± 0.57 L/h) was significantly greater than practice SR (0.65 ± 0.35 L/h; P = .002). Subjects dehydrated during free time but matched fluid losses with FC (0.76 ± 0.29 L/h) during football activities.

Conclusions:

Subjects arrived at camp hypohydrated and maintained this condition. They matched FC and SR during, but dehydrated when not playing, football. This may impair recovery and subsequent performance. Hydration EI seemed to have a positive influence on hydration practices.

McDermott is with the Dept of Health and Human Performance, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Casa and Lopez are with the Dept of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs. Yeargin is with Athletic Training, Indiana State University, Terre Haute. Ganio is with Texas Health Services, Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, 7232 Greenville Ave, Dallas, TX 75231. Mooradian was with the Gatorade Sports Science Institute, Barrington, IL, at the time of the study; she is now with the Dept of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington.

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