Reliability of Measurement of Maximal Isometric Lateral Trunk-Flexion Strength in Athletes Using Handheld Dynamometry

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context: Lateral trunk-flexion strength is an important determinant of overall trunk stability and function, but the reliability in measuring this outcome clinically in athletic individuals is not known. Objective: To determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of lateral trunk-flexion strength measurement in athletic individuals using handheld dynamometry. Design: Reliability study. Setting: Research laboratory. Participants: 12 healthy, athletic individuals. Intervention: Lateral trunk-flexion strength was measured using handheld dynamometry across 2 different trunk placements (lateral aspect of the axilla and laterally at the level of the midtrunk) and 2 testing occasions by 2 therapists. Three maximum-effort trials during a "make test" at each placement were completed for each therapist on both occasions. Main Outcome Measures: Maximum force output was identified and converted to a torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated for each dynamometer placement, therapist, and test occasion to determine intrarater and interrater reliability. Results: Intrarater reliability was moderate to good (ICC2,1 = .53-.77), while interrater reliability was good to very good (ICC2,1 = .79-81) at the axilla position. For the midtrunk position, intrarater reliability was good to very good (ICC2,1 = .80-.86), while interrater reliability was good on both days (ICC2,1 = .87-.88). Finally, the standard errors of measurement were low for the axilla position (0.20 Nm/kg; 95% CI .15, .28) and midtrunk position (0.09 Nm/kg; 95% CI .07, .12). Conclusions: Maximum lateral trunk-flexion strength can be reliably measured in athletic individuals with greater overall strength. Based on the 2 positions used in this study, measurement with a dynamometer placement at the midtrunk may be more reliable than that obtained at the axilla.

The authors are with the Dept of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.