Effect of a 2-Week Joint-Mobilization Intervention on Single-Limb Balance and Ankle Arthrokinematics in Those With Chronic Ankle Instability

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

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Matthew C. Hoch
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David R. Mullineaux
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Richard D. Andreatta
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Robert A. English
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Jennifer M. Medina-McKeon
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Carl G. Mattacola
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Patrick O. McKeon
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Context:

A single talocrural joint-mobilization treatment has improved spatiotemporal measures of postural control but not ankle arthrokinematics in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). However, the effects of multiple treatment sessions on these aspects of function have not been investigated.

Objective:

To examine the effect of a 2-wk anterior-to-posterior joint-mobilization intervention on instrumented measures of single-limb-stance static postural control and ankle arthrokinematics in adults with CAI.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

Research laboratory.

Participants:

12 individuals with CAI (6 male, 6 female; age 27.4 ± 4.3 y, height 175.4 ± 9.78 cm, mass 78.4 ± 11.0 kg).

Intervention:

Subjects received 6 treatments sessions of talocrural grade II joint traction and grade III anterior-to-posterior joint mobilization over 2 wk.

Main Outcome Measures:

Instrumented measures of single-limb-stance static postural control (eyes open and closed) and anterior and posterior talar displacement and stiffness were assessed 1 wk before the intervention (baseline), before the first treatment (preintervention), 24–48 h after the final treatment (postintervention), and 1 wk later (1-wk follow-up). Postural control was analyzed as center-of-pressure velocity, center-of-pressure range, the mean of time-to-boundary minima, and standard deviation of time-to-boundary minima in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions for each visual condition.

Results:

No significant differences were identified in any measures of postural control (P > .08) or ankle arthrokinematics (P > .21).

Conclusions:

The 2-wk talocrural joint-mobilization intervention did not alter instrumented measures of single-limb-stance postural control or ankle arthrokinematics. Despite the absence of change in these measures, this study continues to clarify the role of talocrural joint mobilization as a rehabilitation strategy for patients with CAI.

Hoch is with the School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA. Mullineaux is with the School of Sport, Coaching, & Exercise Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK. Andreatta is with the Div of Communication Sciences & Disorders; English, the Div of Physical Therapy; and Mattacola, the Div of Athletic Training, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Medina-McKeon and McKeon are with the School of Health Sciences and Human Performance, Ithaca College, Ithaca NY.

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