Does Talocrural Joint-Thrust Manipulation Improve Outcomes After Inversion Ankle Sprain?

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $74.00

1 year subscription

USD $99.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $141.00

2 year subscription

USD $185.00

Clinical Scenario:

Ankle sprains account for roughly 10% of sport-related injuries in the active population. The majority of these injuries occur from excessive ankle inversion, leading to lateral ligamentous injury. In addition to pain and swelling, limitations in ankle range of motion (ROM) and self-reported function are common findings. These limitations are thought to be due in part to loss of mobility in the talocrural joint. Accordingly, some investigators have reported using high-velocity, low-amplitude thrust-manipulation techniques directed at the talocrural joint to address deficits in dorsiflexion (Df) ROM and function. This review was conducted to ascertain the impact of talocrural joint-thrust manipulation (TJM) on DF ROM, selfreported function, and pain in patients with a history of ankle sprain.

Focused Clinical Question:

In patients with a history of inversion ankle sprain, does TJM improve outcomes in DF ROM, self-reported function, and/or pain?

The authors are with the Physical Therapy Program, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI.

Address author correspondence to Brett Krueger at krueger.bret@gmail.com.
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Article Sections
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 146 146 45
Full Text Views 12 12 0
PDF Downloads 19 19 0
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar
Cited By