Lower-Limb Muscle-Activation Patterns During Off-Axis Elliptical Compared With Conventional Gluteal-Muscle-Strengthening Exercises

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context:

Gluteal-muscle strength has been identified as an important component of injury prevention and rehabilitation in several common knee injuries. However, many conventionally prescribed gluteal-strengthening exercises are not performed during dynamic weight-bearing activities, which is when most injuries occur.

Objectives:

To compare lower-limb muscle-activation patterns between conventional gluteal-strengthening exercises and off-axis elliptical exercises with motorized foot-plate perturbations designed to activate gluteal muscles during dynamic exercise.

Evidence Acquisition:

Twelve healthy volunteers (26.1 ± 4.7 y) participated in the study. They performed 3 conventional exercises (single-leg squat, forward lunge, and clamshell) and 3 elliptical exercises (regular, while resisting an adduction force, and while resisting an internal-rotation torque). Gluteus medius (GMed) and maximus (GMax), quadriceps, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius muscle activations during each exercise were recorded using surface electromyography (EMG) and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC).

Evidence Synthesis:

Normalized GMed EMG was the highest during the adduction-resistance elliptical exercise (22.4% ± 14.8% MVIC), significantly greater than forward lunge (8.2% ± 3.8% MVIC) and regular elliptical (6.4% ± 2.5% MVIC) and similar to clamshell (19.1% ± 8.8% MVIC) and single-leg squat (18.4% ± 7.9% MVIC). Normalized GMax EMG during adduction-resistance (11.1% ± 7.6% MVIC) and internal-rotation-resistance elliptical (7.4% ± 3.8% MVIC) was significantly greater than regular elliptical (4.4% ± 2.4% MVIC) and was similar to conventional exercises. The single-leg squat required more muscle activation from the quadriceps and gastrocnemius than the elliptical exercises.

Conclusions:

Off-axis elliptical exercise while resisting an adduction force or internal-rotation torque activates gluteal muscles dynamically while avoiding excessive quadriceps activation during a functional weight-bearing activity compared with conventional gluteal-strengthening exercises.

Lin is with the Dept of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Tsai is with the Dept of Physical Therapy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. Press and Zhang are with the Dept of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. Ren is with the Rehabilitation Inst of Chicago, Chicago, IL. Chung is with the Dept of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.

Address author correspondence to Li-Qun Zhang at l-zhang@ northwestern.edu.