Exercises in Motor Development Positions. What Happens With the Activity of Antagonist Muscle Pairs? Pilot Study

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $74.00

1 year subscription

USD  $99.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $141.00

2 year subscription

USD  $185.00

Context: Exercises in motor development positions are employed to activate correct muscular patterns, but the effects on the activity of antagonist muscle pairs remain unknown. Objectives: To determine the effect of using exercises in motor development positions on the activity of antagonist muscle pairs. Another aim was to analyze if introducing some facilitators modifies the muscle activity in the different studied positions. Design: Controlled laboratory study using a single-group repeated measures design. Participants: A total of 21 right handed, healthy adults aged 41 years and older (10 males and 11 females). Setting: Workers of different departments at Maz Hospital. Intervention: Surface electromyography activity of muscle antagonist pairs upper trapezius/lower trapezius, serratus anterior/pectoralis major, and external abdominal oblique/lumbar paraspinal was measured in 3 positions: rest (supine decubitus), reflex turning 1, and modified Vöjta’s first position. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes were mean normalized root mean square (averaged over 2 repetitions) of electromyography signals of antagonist muscle pairs in the 3 analyzed positions. Intraclass correlation coefficients (>.70) (model 3.2), type consistency, and 95% confidence interval were used to estimate the reliability and as exclusion criteria of measurements. Results: Analyzed positions had a significant effect on the activity of the muscles P < .001. There was a significant increase in the activity of the phasic musculature versus its tonic antagonists, except in the case of the external oblique/lumbar paraspinal in modified Vöjta’s first position. Adding possible facilitators such as gaze, breathing, or the combination of both did not show significant changes in the level of activation of the studied muscle groups. Conclusion: Ontogenetic developmental positions can be used to facilitate and improve the activation of phasic muscles.

Casas and Justes are with Rehabilitation, MAZ Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain. Calvo is with DXC Technology, Madrid, Spain.

Casas (mecasas.maz@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
  • 1.

    Vojta V, Peters A, Sánchez de Muniain P, Delgado V. El Principio Vojta: Juegos Musculares En La Locomoción Refleja Y En La Ontogénesis Motora. Barcelona, Spain: Springer-Verlag Ibérica; 1995.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Binová A, Palaščáková . New aspects in the Roswitha Brunkow method by following the activity of selected muscles by EMG. Rehab Fyz Lék. 2008;2:7481.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Kolar P. Clinical Rehabilitation. 1st ed. (Kobesová A, ed.). Praha, Czech Republic: Alena Kobesová-K Vápence; 2013.

  • 4.

    Yoon HS, You JSH. Reflex-mediated dynamic neuromuscular stabilization in stroke patients: EMG processing and ultrasound imaging. Technol Heal Care. 2017;25(suppl 1):99106. PubMed ID: 28582897 doi:10.3233/THC-171311

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Lewit K. Manipulative Therapy. Musculoskeletal Medicine. London, UK: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2010.

  • 6.

    Hermens HJ, Freriks B, Merletti R, et al. European Recommendations for Surface Electromyo graphy. Enschede, The Netherlands: Roessingh Research and Development. doi:10.1016/S1050-6411(00)00027-4

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Koo TK, Li MY. A guideline of selecting and reporting intraclass correlation coefficients for reliability research. J Chiropr Med. 2016;15(2):155163. PubMed ID: 27330520 doi:10.1016/j.jcm.2016.02.012

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Criswell E, Cram JR. Cram’s Introduction to Surface Electromyography. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett; 2011.

  • 9.

    De Mey K, Danneels L, Cagnie B, Huyghe L, Seyns E, Cools AM. Conscious correction of scapular orientation in overhead athletes performing selected shoulder rehabilitation exercises: the effect on trapezius muscle activation measured by surface electromyography. J Orthop Sport Phys Ther. 2013;43(1):310. PubMed ID: 23160271 doi:10.2519/jospt.2013.4283

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Kwon JW, Son SM, Lee NK. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders. J Phys Ther Sci. 2015;27(6):17391742. PubMed ID: 26180310 doi:10.1589/jpts.27.1739

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Tsuruike M, Ellenbecker TS. Serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle activities during multi-joint isotonic scapular exercises and isometric contractions. J Athl Train. 2015;50(2):199210. PubMed ID: 25689561 doi:10.4085/1062-6050-49.3.80

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Chaitow L, DeLany J, Dowling DJ, Evans H. Modern Neuromuscular Techniques. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2011.

  • 13.

    Halaki M, Ginn KA. Normalization of EMG signals: To normalize or not to normalize and what to normalize to? In: M Halaki ed, Computational Intelligence in Electromyography Analysis—A Perspective on Current Applications and Future Challenges. Rijeka, In Tech; 2012:175194. doi:10.5772/49957

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 346 345 27
Full Text Views 22 22 0
PDF Downloads 11 11 0