Effect of Intermittent Hypoxia Training for Dizziness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Objective: To study the effect of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) for dizziness. Design: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial. All participants were recruited from a rehabilitation department in an acute university-affiliated hospital. Intervention: Participants with dizziness were randomly assigned to 2 groups (IHT group and control group). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and Vertigo Visual Analog Scale were conducted at baseline, end of the fourth week. Results: Among 52 subjects, there were18 males and 34 females, ages 35 to 62 years old (mean [SD] = 46.9 [7.93]). Time length since onset ranged from 12 to 34 months (20.2 [7.15] mo). Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale scores, and attack frequencies of dizziness were improved after IHT intervention in the end of the fourth week. There were significant differences between the IHT group and the control group in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale scores, and attack frequencies of dizziness at the end of the fourth week (P < .05). No adverse events occurred during the study. Conclusion: IHT could improve dizziness after intervention at the end of the fourth week. IHT could be the effective method for treating dizziness.

Bao and H.-Y. Liu are with the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Yue Bei People’s Hospital, Shaoguan, China. Tan is with the Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China. Long is with the Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, ShenZhen People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, China. H. Liu is with the Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA.

H.-Y. Liu (liuhuiyudoctor@sohu.com) and H. Liu (Howe.Liu@unthsc.edu) are both corresponding author.
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