Functional Movement Patterns and Body Composition of High-Level Volleyball, Soccer, and Rugby Players

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $74.00

1 year subscription

USD $99.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $141.00

2 year subscription

USD $185.00

Context: Sports practice leads athletes to develop a specific body composition, coordination patterns, and basic motor skills based on the different tactical and physical needs. Objectives: To present and compare a wide range of functional movement patterns and body composition (BC) parameters of high-level male athletes playing different sports and to determine if there was a relationship between the parameters examined. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Team facilities. Participants: A total of 30 volleyball, 25 soccer, and 30 rugby players (age = 25.9 [5.0] y and body mass index = 25.6 [4.1] kg/m2). Interventions: Functional movement patterns and anthropometric measurements were collected by a physician specifically trained. Main Outcome Measures: Body mass index, fat mass, fat-free mass, upper-arm muscle and fat area, calf muscle and fat area, thigh muscle and fat area, and functional movement screen (FMS) scores. In addition to considering the FMS total score, the authors separated the screen into 3 parts: FMSmove, FMSflex, and FMSstab. Results: The rugby players showed a higher number of asymmetrical and dysfunctional movements than the other athletes (P < .01), while the highest scores in FMSflex were obtained by the volleyball players (P < .01). In addition, most of the asymmetrical and painful movements in the athletes were measured on the shoulder mobility test. Muscle and fat areas differed significantly among the athletes (P < .05). Significant associations were found between movement patterns and several BC variables. In particular, large negative correlations were measured between percentage of fat mass (r = −.616; P < .01), upper-arm fat area (r = −.519; P < .01), and FMS total score. Conclusions: Functional movement patterns and BC differ in athletes according to the sport practiced. Furthermore, reaching an optimal BC is essential to achieve a satisfactory quality of movement.

The authors are with the Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Science, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Campa (francesco.campa3@unibo.it) is corresponding author.
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Article Sections
References
  • 1.

    Bahamondes-Avila CCifuentes-Cea BMLara-Padilla EBerral-De La Rosa FJ. Body composition and somatotype in women’s football: South American Championship Sub-17. Int J Morphol. 2012;30:450460.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Milanović ZPantelić SKostić RTrajković NSporiš G. Soccer vs running training effects in young adult men: which programme is more effective in improvement of body composition? Randomized controlled trial. Biol Sport. 2015;32(4):301305. doi:10.5604/20831862.1163693

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Cook GBurton LHoogenboom BJVoight M. Functional movement screening: the use of fundamental movements as an assessment of function—part 1. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2014;9:396409. PubMed ID: 24944860

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Bullock GSBrookreson NKnab AMButler RJ. Examining fundamental movement competency and closed-chain upper-extremity dynamic balance in swimmers. J Strength Cond Res. 2017;31(6):15441551. PubMed ID: 28538303 doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000001627

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Fuller JTChalmers SDebenedictis TAet al. High prevalence of dysfunctional, asymmetrical, and painful movement in elite junior Australian Football players assessed using the functional movement screen. J Sci Med Sport. 2017;20(2):134138. PubMed ID: 27531528 doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2016.05.003

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Mills JDTaunton JEMills WA. The effect of a 10-week training regimen on lumbo-pelvic stability and athletic performance in female athletes: a randomized-controlled trial. Phys Ther Sport. 2005;6(2):6066. doi:10.1016/j.ptsp.2005.02.006

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Lloyd RSOliver JLRadnor JMRhodes BCFaigenbaum ADMyer GD. Relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players. J Sports Sci. 2015;33(1):1119. PubMed ID: 24857046 doi:10.1080/02640414.2014.918642

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Chalmers SFuller JTDebenedictis TAet al. Asymmetry during preseason functional movement screen testing is associated with injury during a junior Australian Football season. J Sci Med Sport. 2017;20(7):653657. PubMed ID: 28233674 doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2016.12.076

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Nicolozakes CPSchneider DKRower BBorchers JHewett TE. Influence of body composition on functional movement screen scores in Collegiate Football players. J Sport Rehabil. 2018;17:121. doi:10.1123/jsr.2015-0080

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Duncan MJStanley M. Functional movement is negatively associated with weight status and positively associated with physical activity in British primary school children. J Obes. 2012;2012:697563. PubMed ID: 22545208 doi:10.1155/2012/697563

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Bryant ESDuncan MJBirch SL. Fundamental movement skills and weight status in British primary school children. Eur J Sport Sci. 2014;14(7):730736. PubMed ID: 24354691 doi:10.1080/17461391.2013.870232

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Portas MDParkin GRoberts JBatterham AM. Maturational effect on functional movement screen score in adolescent soccer players. J Sci Med Sport. 2015;10:854858. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.001

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Toselli SCampa F. Anthropometry and functional movement patterns in elite male volleyball players of different competitive levels. J Strength Cond Res. 2018;32(9):26012611. doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000002368

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Lohman TGRoche AFMartorell R. Anthropometric Standardization Reference Manual. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics Books; 1988.

  • 15.

    Durnin JWomersley J. Body fat assessed from total body density and its estimation from skinfold thickness: measurements on 481 men and women aged from 16 to 72 years. Br J Nutr. 1974;32:7797. PubMed ID: 4843734 doi:10.1079/BJN19740060

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Frisancho AR. Anthropometric Standards. An Interactive Nutritional Reference of Body Size and Body Composition for Children and Adults. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press; 2008.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Hopkins WGMarshall SWBatterham AMHanin J. Progressive statistics for studies in sports medicine and exercise science. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009;41:313. PubMed ID: 19092709 doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31818cb278

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Yeung JCleves AGriffiths HNokes L. Mobility, proprioception, strength and FMS as predictors of injury in professional footballers. BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med. 2016;2(1):e000134. doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2016-000134

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Kiesel KPlisky PButler R. Functional movement test scores improve following a standardized off-season intervention program in professional football players. Scand J Med Sci Sport. 2011;21(2):287292. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.01038.x

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Bodden JGNeedham RAChockalingam N. The effect of an intervention program on functional movement screen test scores in mixed martial arts athletes. J Strength Cond Res. 2015;29(1):219225. PubMed ID: 23860293 doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e3182a480bf

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Kerr ZYMarshall SWDompier TPCorlette JKlossner DAGilchrist J. College sports-related injuries—United States, 2009–10 through 2013–14 academic years. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64:13301336. PubMed ID: 26655724 doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm6448a2

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Ekstrand JHägglund MWaldén M. Epidemiology of muscle injuries in professional football (soccer). Am J Sports Med. 2011;39(6):12261232. PubMed ID: 21335353 doi:10.1177/0363546510395879

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Junge ACheung KEdwards TDvorak J. Injuries in youth amateur soccer and rugby players—comparison of incidence and characteristics. Br J Sports Med. 2004;38(2):168172. PubMed ID: 15039253 doi:10.1136/bjsm.2002.003020

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Tillman MDHass CJBrunt DBennett GR. Jumping and landing techniques in elite women’s volleyball. J Sports Sci Med. 2004;3(1):3036. PubMed ID: 24497818

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Bere TKruczynski JVeintimilla NHamu YBahr R. Injury risk is low among world-class volleyball players: 4-year data from the FIVB Injury Surveillance System. Br J Sports Med. 2015;49(17):11321137. PubMed ID: 26194501 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-094959

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Fontana FYColosio ADe Roia GFDa Lozzo GPogliaghi S. Anthropometrics of Italian senior male rugby union players: from elite to second division. Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2015;10(6):674680. PubMed ID: 25932593 doi:10.1123/ijspp.2015-0014

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 121 121 56
Full Text Views 28 28 13
PDF Downloads 14 14 1
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar