Factors Associated with Adherence to Sport Injury Rehabilitation in College-Age Recreational Athletes

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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The purpose of the present study was to identify factors that contribute to adherent or nonadherent behavior during sport injury rehabilitation programs. Thirty-nine male and female college-age recreational athletes participated. The variables under examination were self-motivation/apathy, perceived exertion, social support, scheduling concerns, the clinical environment, and pain tolerance. Independent t tests (p < .05) were used to determine the difference between the adherer and nonadherer groups on each of the six variables. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was employed to determine which of the six variables contributed most to the overall difference. Results of the t tests indicated that significant differences were seen for self-motivation, scheduling concerns, and pain tolerance. The DFA indicated that scheduling concerns contributed most to the overall group difference.

Jeff Fields was a graduate student with the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Florida, at the time of this study and is currently with The Musculoskeletal Institute, 801 Merrick Ave., East Meadow, NY 11554. Milledge Murphey, MaryBeth Horodyski, and Christine Stopka are with the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

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