Examining Psychological Factors during Injury Rehabilitation

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of goal setting on performance and on a number of psychological variables such as self-efficacy, pretesting anxiety, and self-satisfaction during an injury rehabilitation program. An experimental group (n = 20) and a control group (n = 17) of injured physical education students were studied. Both groups underwent a 4-week quadriceps strengthening program on an isokinetic dynamometer, with the experimental group setting specific personal goals in each training session. The experimental group improved in performance significantly more than the control group. Although both groups exhibited an increase in self-efficacy and a decrease in pretesting anxiety, only the experimental group had an increase in self-satisfaction with performance. Results confirm that incorporating goal setting in the rehabilitation process enhances rehabilitation results.

Yannis Theodorakis, Anastasia Beneca, and Parascevi Malliou are with the Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Democritos University of Thrace, 69100 Komotini, Greece. Marios Goudas is with the Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Thessalia, Tricala, Greece.