Conservative Management of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome in the Athletic Population

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Shoulder pain is a common complaint among overhead athletes. Oftentimes, the cause of pain is impingement of the supraspinatus, bicipital tendon, and subacromial bursa between the greater tuberosity and the acromial arch. The mechanisms of impingement syndrome include anatomical abnormalities, muscle weakness and fatigue of the glenohumeral and scapular stabilizers, posterior capsular tightness, and glenohumeral instability. In order to effectively manage impingement syndrome nonoperatively, the therapist must understand the complex anatomy and biomechanics of the shoulder joint, as well as how to thoroughly evaluate the athlete. The results of the evaluation can then be used to design and implement a rehabilitation program that addresses the cause of impingement specific to the athlete. The purpose of this article is to provide readers with a thorough overview of what causes impingement and how to effectively evaluate and conservatively manage it in an athletic population.

Joseph B. Myers is with the Neuromuscular and Sports Medicine Research Laboratory, Musculoskeletal Research Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15261.

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