Use of Goal Setting to Enhance Self-Efficacy After Sports-Related Injury: A Critically Appraised Topic

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Clinical Scenario: Patients after sports-related injury experience deficits in self-efficacy. Goal setting may be an appropriate psychoeducation technique to enhance self-efficacy after sports-related injury. Clinical Question: Does goal setting–enhanced rehabilitation improve self-efficacy compared with traditional rehabilitation alone in individuals with sports-related injury? Summary of Key Findings: Two randomized controlled trials were included. The two studies selected assessed changes in self-efficacy before and after a goal-setting intervention following sports-related injury in an athletic population. Both studies used the Sports Injury Rehabilitation Beliefs Survey to evaluate self-efficacy. Clinical Bottom Line: There is currently consistent, good-quality, patient-oriented evidence that supports the use of goal setting to improve self-efficacy in patients undergoing rehabilitation for sports-related injury compared with the standard of care group. Future research should examine optimal timing for the implementation of goal setting in order to enhance self-efficacy following sports-related injury. Strength of Recommendation: The grade of A is recommended by the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy for consistent, good-quality, patient-oriented evidence.

Brinkman and Genoese are with the Post-Professional Athletic Training Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Baez is with the Department of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Hoch is with the Department of Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

Brinkman (c.brinkman@uky.edu) is corresponding author.
Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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