Single-Leg Jump Performance Before and After Exercise in Healthy and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Individuals

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context: Many clinicians measure lower-extremity symmetry after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR); however, testing is completed in a rested state rather than postexercise. Testing postexercise may better model conditions under which injury occurs. Objective: To compare changes in single-leg performance in healthy and individuals with history of ACLR before and after exercise. Design: Repeated-measures case-control. Setting: Laboratory. Patients: Fifty-two subjects (25 control and 27 ACLR). Intervention: Thirty minutes of exercise. Main Outcome Measures: Limb symmetry and involved limb performance (nondominant for healthy) for single-leg hop, ground contact time, and jump height during the 4-jump test. Cohen d effect sizes were calculated for all differences identified using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: Healthy controls hopped farther than ACLR before (d = 0.65; confidence interval [CI], 0.09 to 1.20) and after exercise (d = 0.60; CI, 0.04 to 1.15). Those with ACLR had longer ground contact time on the reconstructed limb compared with the uninvolved limb after exercise (d = 0.53; CI, −0.02 to 1.09), and the reconstructed limb had greater ground contact time compared with the healthy control limb after exercise (d = 0.38; CI, −0.21 to 0.73). ACLR were less symmetrical than healthy before (d = 0.38; CI, 0.17 to 0.93) and after exercise (d = 0.84; CI, 0.28 to 1.41), and the reconstructed limb demonstrated decreased jump height compared with the healthy control limbs before (d = 0.75; CI, 0.19 to 1.31) and after exercise (d = 0.79; CI, 0.23 to 1.36). Conclusions: ACLR became more symmetric, which may be from adaptations of the reconstructed limb after exercise. Changes in performance and symmetry may provide additional information regarding adaptations to exercise after reconstruction.

Bookbinder, Hertel, and Hart are with the Department of Kinesiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. Slater is with the Center for Bionic Medicine, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Chicago, IL. Simpson is with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

Slater (lindsay.slater@northwestern.edu) is corresponding author.
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