The Effect of Total Motion Release on Functional Movement Screen Composite Scores: A Randomized Controlled Trial

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) provides clinicians with objective criteria to assess movement patterns and overall movement quality. A relationship between low FMS composite scores and increased risk of injury has been reported, and researchers have begun to test the effect of interventions to improve FMS composite scores. Total Motion Release (TMR®), a novel active movement intervention, has been found to produce improvements in range of motion, as well as patient-reported pain and dysfunction. The effect of TMR® on movement patterns or movement quality is unknown. Objective: To assess the effect of a single treatment application of TMR® on FMS composite scores in participants with low baselines FMS composite scores. Design: Single-blind randomized controlled study. Setting: Athletic training laboratory. Participants: Twenty-four participants (12 males and 12 females) with FMS composite scores of 13 or lower were randomly assigned to either a treatment group or control group. The FMS screening procedure was completed on all participants in a pretest and posttest design. Interventions: In between FMS testing sessions, participants assigned to the treatment group completed the TMR® FAB 6-treatment protocol, whereas the control group participants did not receive an intervention. Following the treatment period (ie, 20 min), participants again completed the FMS. Main Outcome Measure: FMS composite scores. Results: The improvement in FMS composite scores was significantly better (P ≤ .001, Cohen’s d = 1.69) in the TMR® group (mean change = 3.7 [2.2]) compared with the control group (mean change = 0.7 [1.2]). Conclusions: A single application of the TMR® FAB 6 protocol produced immediate acute improvements in FMS composite scores in a young, physically active population compared with no intervention. Clinical Relevance: Research evidence exists to suggest impaired or dysfunctional movement patterns or movement quality increases risk of injury. The FMS is commonly utilized to assess movement quality and risk of injury. This study provides initial evidence that the use of TMR® rapidly produces acute improvements in movement quality, as measured by the FMS.

The authors are with the Department of Movement Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

Baker (russellb@uidaho.edu) is corresponding author.
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