Improvements in Lower-Extremity Function Following a Rehabilitation Program With Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulation in Females With Patellofemoral Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a challenging condition, with altered kinematics and muscle activity as 2 common impairments. Single applications of patterned electrical neuromuscular stimulation (PENS) have improved both kinematics and muscle activity in females with PFP; however, the use of PENS in conjunction with a rehabilitation program has not been evaluated. Objective: To determine the effects of a 4-week rehabilitation program with PENS on lower-extremity biomechanics and electromyography (EMG) during a single-leg squat (SLS) and a step-down task (SDT) in individuals with PFP. Study Design: Double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Setting: Laboratory. Patients of Other Participants: Sixteen females with PFP (age 23.3 [4.9] y, mass 66.3 [13.5] kg, height 166.1 [5.9] cm). Intervention: Patients completed a 4-week supervised rehabilitation program with or without PENS. Main Outcome Measures: Curve analyses for lower-extremity kinematics and EMG activity (gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and adductor longus) were constructed by plotting group means and 90% confidence intervals throughout 100% of each task, before and after the rehabilitation program. Mean differences (MDs) and SDs were calculated where statistical differences were identified. Results: No differences at baseline in lower-extremity kinematics or EMG were found between groups. Following rehabilitation, the PENS group had significant reduction in hip adduction between 29% and 47% of the SLS (MD = 4.62° [3.85°]) and between 43% and 69% of the SDT (MD = 6.55° [0.77°]). Throughout the entire SDT, there was a decrease in trunk flexion in the PENS group (MD = 10.91° [1.73°]). A significant decrease in gluteus medius activity was seen during both the SLS (MD = 2.77 [3.58]) and SDT (MD = 4.36 [5.38]), and gluteus maximus during the SLS (MD = 1.49 [1.46]). No differences were seen in the Sham group lower-extremity kinematics for either task. Conclusion: Rehabilitation with PENS improved kinematics in both tasks and decreased EMG activity. This suggests that rehabilitation with PENS may improve muscle function during functional tasks.

Glaviano is with the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA. Marshall is with the Department of Health & Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA. Mangum is with the College of Health Professionals and Sciences, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA. Hart, Hertel, and Saliba are with the Exercise and Sport Injury Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. Hart and Russell are with the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Glaviano (Neal.Glaviano@UToledo.edu) is corresponding author.

Supplementary Materials

    • Supplementary Figure S1 (pdf 153 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S2 (pdf 154 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S3 (pdf 154 KB)
    • Supplementary Figure S4 (pdf 158 KB)