Exercise-Based Rehabilitation and Manual Therapy Compared With Exercise-Based Rehabilitation Alone in the Treatment of Chronic Ankle Instability: A Critically Appraised Topic

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Clinical Scenario: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) commonly display lower levels of self-reported function and health-related quality of life. Several rehabilitation interventions, including manual therapy, have been investigated to help CAI patients overcome these deficits. However, it is unclear if the addition of manual therapy to exercise-based rehabilitation is more effective than exercise-based rehabilitation alone. Clinical Question: Does incorporating manual therapy with exercise-based rehabilitation improve patient-reported outcomes when compared with exercise-based rehabilitation alone? Summary of Key Findings: The literature was searched for articles that examined the difference in outcomes for patients with CAI between manual therapy with exercise-based rehabilitation and exercise-based rehabilitation alone. A total of 3 peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials were identified. Two articles demonstrated improved patient-reported outcome scores following the incorporation of manual therapy with exercise-based rehabilitation, whereas one study found no statistically significant differences between interventions. Clinical Bottom Line: The current evidence suggests that incorporating manual therapy in addition to exercised-based rehabilitation may improve patient-reported outcome scores in patients with CAI. Strength of Recommendation: In accordance with the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy, the grade of A is recommended due to consistent evidence from high-quality studies.

Walsh, Bain, and Gribble are with the Department of Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Hoch is with the Department of Athletic Training and Clinical Nutrition, Sports Medicine Research Institute, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

Hoch (Matt.Hoch@uky.edu) is corresponding author.
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