Factors Influencing Concussion Reporting Intention in Adolescent Athletes

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Clinical Scenario: Concussions are severely underreported, with only 47.3% of high school athletes reporting their concussion. The belief was that athletes who were better educated on the signs and symptoms and potential dangers of concussion would be more likely to report. However, literature has shown inconsistent evidence on the efficacy of concussion education, improving reporting behaviors. Factors such as an athlete’s attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control have shown promise in predicting intention to report concussions in athletes. Focused Clinical Question: Do attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control influence adolescent athletes’ intention to report? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies (1 randomized control and 2 cross-sectional surveys) were included. Across the 3 studies, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control positively influenced athletes’ reporting intention. The studies found that attitude toward concussion reporting and perceived behavioral control were the most influential predictors of reporting intention. Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate evidence to suggest that positive attitudes, supportive subjective norms, and increased perceived behavioral control influence reporting intention in secondary school athletes. Strength of Recommendation: Grade B evidence exists that positive attitudes, supportive subjective norms, and increased perceived behavioral control positively influence concussion reporting intention in secondary school athletes.

Cook is with Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, USA. Hunt is with the Department of Health Sciences and Kinesiology, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, USA.

Hunt (thunt@georgiasouthern.edu) is corresponding author.
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