The Effects of the Short Foot Exercise on Navicular Drop: A Critically Appraised Topic

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Clinical Scenario: Deformation of the arch, as measured by navicular drop (ND), is linked to lower-extremity musculoskeletal injuries. The short foot exercise (SFE) has been used to strengthen the intrinsic foot muscles that support the arch. Clinical Question: Does the SFE decrease ND in healthy adults? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies that examined the use of the SFE on ND were included. A randomized control trial that compared the SFE to a towel-curl exercise and a control group found no significant differences between the 3 groups. A randomized control trial compared the SFE to the use of arch support insoles in individuals with a flexible flatfoot and found a significant improvement in the SFE group. A prospective cohort study, without a control group, reported a significant decrease in ND following a 4-week SFE intervention without a regression at an 8-week follow-up. Overall, two of the three studies reported a significant reduction in ND following an SFE. Clinical Bottom Line: There is preliminary data supporting the use of the SFE to decrease ND—particularly in individuals with a flexible flatfoot. However, issues with the study designs make it difficult to interpret the data. Strength of Recommendation: Due to limited evidence, there is grade B evidence to support the use of the SFE to decrease ND.

Haun is with Providence Sports Medicine, Portland, OR, USA. Brown, Hannigan, and Johnson are with the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA.

Johnson (Sam.johnson@oregonstate.edu) is corresponding author.
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