Internal and External Training Workload Quantification in 4 Experienced Paracanoeing Athletes

in Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
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Context: Paracanoeing is one of the adapted sports eligible for different motor impairments. The acute:chronic workload ratio (ACWR) is an index between acute and chronic training workload. However, no studies have analyzed this variable in paracanoeing, relating it with training recovery markers. Objective: This study aimed to quantify the internal (session rating of perceived exertion) and external (distance traveled and total training time) training workloads in 4 experienced paracanoe athletes over 9 months and 5 canoeing events. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Rehabilitation Hospital Network, Paralympic Program. Participants: Four experienced paracanoe athletes participated in 36 weeks of training for 5 events. Main Outcomes Measures: The daily and weekly training workload, monotony, ACWR, distance, and total training time were described for all the training phases. The perceived recovery status scale (PRS) and medicine ball throw (MBT) were used to quantify recovery. Results: The average daily and weekly training workload varied from 213.1 to 239.3 and 767.3 to 1036.8 arbitrary units, respectively. Average ACWR results ranged from 0.96 to 1.10 in the 4 athletes, findings that were outside the safety zone in 38% of the training weeks. All the correlations between MBT and PRS were classified as weak (ρ between .20 and .39, P > .05). ACWR showed a very weak correlation with MBT and moderately and highly significant correlations with PRS in 2 athletes, respectively. Conclusions: The training workloads of 4 paracanoe athletes may serve as a comparison with other periodization models. Pretraining recovery assessments (MBT and PRS) exhibited a low, nonsignificant correlation. However, ACWR correlated significantly with PRS in 2 athletes and might be a suitable tool for daily training adjustments.

Ribeiro Neto is with the Paralympic Sports Program, SARAH Network of Rehabilitation Hospitals/SARAH Brasilia, Brasilia, Brazil. Alsamir Tibana is with the Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFTM), Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil; and the Graduate Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia, Distrito Federal, Brazil. Rodrigues Dorneles and Gomes Costa are with the SARAH Network of Rehabilitation Hospitals, Brasilia, Brazil.

Ribeiro Neto (fredribeironeto@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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