The Effects of Video Observational Training on Video and Live Observational Proficiency

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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The purposes of this study were to develop and implement an observational training program and to assess the effects of a video observational training program on video and live observational proficiency. Physical education majors took a pretest in both a video and a live environment to assess observational proficiency. The task was observing children batting and answering questions regarding the critical features of the movement. The students were then placed into either a treatment (n = 12) or a control (n = 11) group. There were no differences between groups on either assessment (p > .05). The treatment group then participated in a video observational training program. After the training, all subjects took a posttest in each environment to assess observational proficiency. The training was found to be effective in improving video observational proficiency (p < .05) but not live observational proficiency (p > .05). These results provide support for the effectiveness of video observational training in developing video observational proficiency but not live observational proficiency.

J. Eckrich is with the HPER Department at Augustana College, Sioux Falls, SD 57197. C.J. Widule, R.A. Shrader, and J. Maver are with the Health, Kinesiology, and Leisure Studies Department at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.