Primary School Student Teachers’ Physical Self-Perceptions and Attitudes Toward Teaching Physical Education

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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The importance of physical self-perceptions in relation to exercise behavior has been acknowledged. However, the importance of physical self-perceptions in relation to specific attitudes has been overlooked. This study used a self-report questionnaire to assess the physical self-perceptions and attitudes toward teaching physical education of a sample of final-year, female, primary school student teachers (N = 116). The most positive attitudes toward teaching physical education were recorded by students reporting more positive physical self-perceptions. Comparisons between students with low and high attitudes toward teaching physical education using MANOVA and discriminant function analysis confirmed these findings. Specifically, students with the most positive attitudes toward teaching physical education reported stronger self-perceptions of sports competence, and perceived competence in the sport subdomain was deemed more important than the other subdomains. It is speculated that these findings reflect a process of cognitive consonance mediating physical self-perceptions and attitudes.

G.E.J. Faulkner is with the Department of Physical Education, Sports Science and Recreation Management at Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, England. C.G. Reeves is with the School of Education at the University of Greenwich, Avery Hill Campus, Bexley Road, London SE9 2PQ, England.

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