Implications of Student Teachers’ Implementation of a Curricular Innovation

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Steven Wright University of New Hampshire

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Michael McNeill Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

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Joan Fry Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

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Steven Tan Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

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Clara Tan Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

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Paul Schempp University of Georgia

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This study examined 49 student teachers’ actions and perspectives when implementing a curricular innovation (the tactical games approach). Data were collected via videotaped lessons, interviews, and follow-up questionnaires. Questions for interviews and questionnaires were pilot tested and data were analyzed using the constant comparison method. Videotape analysis was facilitated by Noldus’s Observer (4.0) software and was tested for interobserver reliability. Results revealed that pupils were actively engaged for more than half (52%) of class time. The majority of student teachers’ questions were of low order (76%). The greatest challenges student teachers faced were pupils being new to the approach, or lacking skills. The greatest facilitators to implementing the tactical approach were physical education teacher education courses. Student teachers suggested that more opportunities to teach using the tactical approach in schools during methods classes would better prepare them for practicum. A follow-up questionnaire, one year later, determined that 87% of participants were still using the “innovation” in their teaching.

Wright is with the Dept. of Kinesiology, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824; McNeill, S. Tan, and C. Tan are with the Physical Education & Sport Science Group, Nanyang Technical Univ., Singapore 637616; Fry is with the Dept. of Exercise and Movement Sciences, William Paterson Univ., Wayne, NJ 07470; and Schempp is with the Sport Instruction Research Lab., Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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