The Influence of State Motivation, Content Relevance and Affective Learning on High School Students’ Intentions to Use Class Content Following Completion of Compulsory Physical Education

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education

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Collin WebsterUniversity of South Carolina

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Diana MîndrilăUniversity of South Carolina

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Glenn WeaverUniversity of South Carolina

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Little research has examined mechanisms leading to the utilization of compulsory physical education content in future contexts. This study tested a model in which motivation to be in physical education class functions as a predisposition influencing perceptions of teacher communication of content relevance, perceptions of course relevance to one’s personal life, affect for physical education and intentions to apply class content in the future. High school students (N = 636) enrolled in compulsory physical education classes completed questionnaires assessing each of these variables. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated the questionnaire items were adequate indicators of the five constructs. Structural equation modeling with diagonally weighted least squares estimation supported the hypothesized model. The results suggest that continued use of knowledge and skills learned in physical education might hinge on teachers making physical education appealing to students and communicating how class content connects with students’ personal interests.

Webster is with the University of South Carolina—Physical Education and Athletic Training, Columbia, SC. Mîndrilă is with the University of South Carolina—Educational Studies, Columbia, SC. Weaver is with the University of South Carolina—Physical Education and Athletic Training, Columbia, SC.

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