Class-Related Emotions in Secondary Physical Education: A Control-Value Theory Approach

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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Purpose:

Grounded in control-value theory, a model of students’ achievement emotions in physical education (PE) was investigated.

Methods:

A path analysis tested hypotheses that students’ (N = 529) perceptions of teacher responsiveness, assertiveness, and clarity predict control and value beliefs which, in turn, predict enjoyment and boredom.

Results:

Teacher clarity predicted student control (β = .31; R2= .09) and value (β = .21; R2= .07) beliefs. Value and control beliefs positively predicted enjoyment (β = .71; β = .11; R2 = .58) and negatively predicted boredom (β = -.61; β = -.13; R2 = .47).

Discussion:

Findings provide meaningful information about the source of students’ emotional experiences in PE. The importance of instructional clarity within the model highlights the need for teachers to use a variety of clarifying strategies during instruction. The strong links between value beliefs and emotions suggest teachers need to explicitly discuss the intrinsic and extrinsic worth of PE content.

The authors are with the School of Kinesiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

Address author correspondence to Kelly L. Simonton at ksimo36@lsu.edu.
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