An Investigation Into the Reasons Physical Education Professionals Use Twitter

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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Purpose: To date, there have been limited investigations relating to physical education (PE) professionals’ engagement in the use of Twitter. Consequently, the aim of the study was to investigate the reasons PE professionals use Twitter, with questions underpinned by Casey, Goodyear, and Armour’s three-level conceptual classification framework of Pedagogies of Technology. Method: The application of Leximancer text mining software was uniquely employed to text mine the survey data to determine the key themes and concepts. Results: It was discovered that PE professionals perceived the Twitter platform to be highly valuable to connect with others in the profession, learn from others, and share ideas (both within schools and more broadly) via a convenient, usable form of technology. Discussion/Conclusions: Understanding the reasons PE professionals use Twitter can provide a broader understanding for those contemplating the utilization of this platform and inform future Twitter/social media research directions for the field of PE.

Harvey is with the Department of Recreation and Sport Pedagogy, Patton College of Education, Ohio University, Athens, OH. Hyndman is with the Faculty of Arts and Education, Charles Sturt University, Albury-Wodonga Campus, New South Wales, Australia.

Address author correspondence to Stephen Harvey at harveys3@ohio.edu.
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