Chapter 5: Recruitment in PETE: Survey Results and Discussion

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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Background/Purpose: This aspect of this study examined physical education teacher education (PETE) program coordinators’ perspectives on their role in student recruitment, including common recruitment strategies and their effectiveness, perceived barriers to engaging in program recruitment, and commonly used marketing strategies. Method: Data were collected from 175 PETE program coordinators through the online survey described fully in Chapter 4 of this monograph. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and one-way analyses of variance. Results: Strategies perceived as effective in recruiting high school students were moderately associated with those most often implemented (r = .46–.50). Some limited differences by Carnegie level were found related to reported barriers to participation in recruitment activities. Discussion/Conclusion: This study reveals general consistency between PETE coordinators’ perceptions of the most effective and frequently used recruitment strategies to attract students into PETE initial licensure programs. Strategies, barriers, and suggested future directions align with much of the PETE recruitment literature.

Ayers is with Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Woods is with the University of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

Address author correspondence to Suzan F. Ayers at s.ayers@wmich.edu.
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education

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