In-Service Teachers’ and Educational Assistants’ Professional Development Experiences for Inclusive Physical Education

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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Purpose: The objective of this study was to understand and learn about in-service teachers’ and educational assistants’ professional development (PD) experiences for inclusive physical education (IPE), individually and collaboratively. Method: Using a multiple case study design and hermeneutic inquiry, the experiences of three teachers and three educational assistants were investigated. Data sources included semistructured interviews, focus groups, observations, and researcher reflective journals. Results: The practitioners’ experiences with PD for IPE revealed the following major themes: (a) it is just not there: IPE-PD is rare, (b) taking initiative: maximizing consultants as IPE-PD, and (c) together we are better: desire for collaborative IPE-PD. Discussion/Conclusions: PD for IPE needs to be developed and implemented for teachers and educational assistants working as an instructional team together. Engaging these practitioners in collaborative IPE-PD can support their learning and the teaching of IPE and acts as a starting point to form communities of practice in IPE.

The authors are with the Department of Elementary Education, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Morrison (hjmorris@ualberta.ca) is corresponding author.
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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