Using Simple Interactions to Improve Pedagogy in a Cross-Aged Leadership Program

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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  • 1 The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Cross-aged teaching programs provide leadership experiences to youth who aim to influence children to be responsible, caring, and compassionate. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a leadership development protocol on relationship development in an established cross-aged teaching program. Method: Guided by the developmental relationships framework, “Simple Interactions” was implemented with a group of nine youth leaders. The intent was to help them improve their relationships with children in four categories (a) connection, (b) reciprocity, (c) participation, and (d) progression. Data were collected through reflection documents and focus group interviews. Results: Qualitative results explain how Simple Interactions impacted reflection and revealed strategies youth leaders used to build relationships with children. Discussion: The findings suggest that the Simple Interactions protocol may provide an innovative strategy to promote reflective practice and develop positive relationships in a cross-aged teaching program.

The authors are with the Department of Kinesiology, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC.

Hemphill (hemphill@uncg.edu) is corresponding author.
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