“What’s Worth Doing?”: A Qualitative Historical Analysis of the TPSR Model

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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  • 1 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • 2 Northern Illinois University
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Purpose: The authors sought to trace the development of the teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model from its initial conception by Don Hellison as a humanistic approach to teaching physical education to the current version of the model through qualitative historiography. Methods: Data sources included: (a) books written by Don, (b) sources that discussed the evolution of the model, and (c) supplemental texts that are important to the TPSR literature. Results: The authors identified four phases of TPSR model development: (a) setting the stage for a humanistic approach through practical inquiry, (b) moving beyond balls and bats to developing a model focused on the affective domain, (c) further defining humanistic goals and teaching strategies, and (d) continuous tinkering in the context of a living model. Discussion/Conclusions: Lessons learned about the model are discussed in relation to practical inquiry, and recommendations are made related to the future of the TPSR model.

Richards is with the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. Shiver is with the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, USA.

Richards (karichar@illinois.edu) is corresponding author.
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